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hope this isn't a silly question - Taking refuge of buddha, dhamma, sangha and lj :-P [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
Taking refuge of buddha, dhamma, sangha and lj :-P

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hope this isn't a silly question [Jan. 22nd, 2007|10:05 pm]
Taking refuge of buddha, dhamma, sangha and lj :-P
buddhism_chat
[r_monoxide]
So when Buddhist monks and nuns wear the saffron colored robes do they always look like the traditional robes? I met a woman out in Berkeley that looked like she might have been wearing saffron robes but she had this thing on over it all that looked like a saffron colored puffy ski jacket. Is this some sort sort of religious clothing that I wasn't aware of? I thought there was a special official coat that nuns and monks are supposed to wear when it is cold that doesn't look like a puffy ski jacket.
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[User Picture]From: ladyisabella
2007-01-23 06:27 pm (UTC)

Good question!

Buddhanet had this to say:

"Q. 10: Is there a minimum and maximum number of layers [of clothing] a monk can wear? Does the rule alter with the weather?

A: There is a minimum in that the bhikkhu must be properly and modestly dressed, especially in public. During the cold season in India, the Buddha allowed a double-layered outer robe (sa nghaati) to be used and so — using the Great Standards as a guide — in even colder climates extra layers may be allowable. In countries where hypothermia may be a danger, the use of extra layers seems sensible — especially if this cuts down on heating and medical expenses. (That a bhikkhu lives as frugally as possible is a major aspect of the Vinaya.) However, it is generally felt very important that the traditional robes remain the basic dress and 'extra layers' should not obscure this."

I don't know what the traditional cold weather wear is for schools outside the Vinaya, but I noticed one of the local Temple nuns (Pureland Chinese School) at the market the other day. She was wearing a saffron colored Chinese coat (long like a trench coat, with frog closures and Chinese collar). It was pretty simple and plain, but looked warm.

I also know that there are special rules about gifts. I believe the nuns are allowed to use things given to them, so if someone gifted the coat to the Temple or her in particular, she's welcome to use it. It's usually known among the populace what is and isn't an appropriate gift. Since puffy ski jackets sort of fall into a grey area, who knows.
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[User Picture]From: ladyisabella
2007-01-23 06:29 pm (UTC)

Re: Good question!

Error correction:

"I don't know what the traditional cold weather wear is for schools outside the referenced Vinaya, but I noticed one of the local Temple nuns (Pureland Chinese School) at the market the other day."
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From: r_monoxide
2007-01-23 07:05 pm (UTC)

Re: Good question!

well I'm not 100% sure that she was wearing the robes anyway. She was so much shorter than me that I didn't get a good look at her clothes until she was walking away. It was certainly the right color scheme. Maybe in Berkeley it is ok to wear puffy saffron colored ski jackets?
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